Call Us 866.600.CARE


Flu Shot Information

For Employees

2017 Flu Shot Day
Tuesday, Oct. 3
6:30 am to 7 pm
Hospital Conference Room 1130

Vaccine will be offered free to all UI Hospital and Clinic employees and volunteers working in the UI Hospital and Clinics. Students with clinical rotations in the hospital and clinics will be offered free vaccine on the flu shot day (October 3) only. UI Health ID and i-card will be required for vaccination and electronic tracking of administration.

Additional Flu Shot Information and Schedule
Click here for more information

What is the cost? 

We accept most insurance plans for flu shot coverage. Please call the pharmacy for details.

Where can I get the flu shot at UI Health? 


UNIVERSITY VILLAGE PHARMACY 
722 W. Maxwell Street, 2nd floor 
(Campus Care location) 
312-355-1697  

TAYLOR STREET/EEI PHARMACY
1855 W. Taylor Street, 1st floor    
(Campus Care location) 
312-996-6540

OUTPATIENT CARE CENTER/OCC PHARMACY

1801 W. Taylor Street, Suite 3B
312-996-9058   

WOOD STREET PHARMACY
40 S. Wood Street
312-996-6887   

MILE SQUARE PHARMACY
220 S. Wood Street, Suite 1045
312-413-1767  

Hours:

Monday-Friday 9am to 5pm*
Saturdays at University Village Pharmacy 9am to 1pm
Saturdays at Wood Street Pharmacy 9am to 3pm

*Some pharmacies may have extended hours, please call for details  

1. Pregnant women should get the flu shot.

Pregnant women who receive the flu shot will not only be protected during their pregnancy, but after their pregnancy including providing protection for their baby.  During pregnancy a mother passes on antibodies to her baby, which then provides protection after birth. Studies have shown that a pregnant woman's risk of flu-associated acute respiratory infection can be reduced by 50% and also protect their baby from the influenza virus for up to four months after birth (CDC, 2017a).

2. The flu shot won't give you the flu.

No, a flu shot cannot cause flu illness. The influenza viruses contained in a flu shot are inactivated (killed), which means they cannot cause infection. Flu vaccine manufacturers kill the viruses used in the vaccine during the process of making vaccine, and batches of flu vaccine are tested to make sure they are safe. In randomized, blinded studies, where some people get flu shots and others get sterile salt-water shots, the only differences in symptoms was increased soreness in the arm and redness at the injection site among people who got the flu shot. There were no differences in terms of body aches, fever, cough, runny nose or sore throat.  Which means that when some people say that they got sick right after getting the vaccine, what might have happened was that they were starting to get sick before they received the shot. 

3. The flu is a serious disease - for everyone.

Even if you are healthy, you can still get the flu and develop serious complications. A variety of complications may be caused by the influenza virus. Moderate complications can occur such as sinus infections, ear infections, or more serious complications such as pneumonia, inflammation of the heart, brain, muscle tissues, asthma flare ups or organ failure. While those who are considered to be high risk (age, living conditions, chronic illness, obesity, pregnancy, or a weakened immune system) may have a greater chance of experiencing severe symptoms, everyone, regardless of health status has a risk of becoming severely ill due to the influenza virus (CDC, 2014; Harvard Medical School, 2017; Mayo Clinic, 2016)

4. The flu vaccine helps prevent the spread of flu.

Influenza is a very contagious disease that travels through the air in droplets. An individual who is infected with influenza can spread the disease by coughing, sneezing, or talking. The influenza virus has the ability to spread up to 6 feet away. While washing your hands, covering your mouth when you cough or sneeze, and avoiding close contact with infected individuals may yield protection benefits, the most effective way to prevent the spread of the influenza virus is through the vaccine (CDC, 2014; Mayo Clinic, 2016).  Getting the flu vaccine helps you fight the flu.  Your body develops defense to either prevent illness or reduce the severity of illness from the flu.

5. It's never too late to get the flu vaccine - but sooner is better!

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2017a), recommends receiving the flu shot every year by the end of October. It takes approximately 2 weeks for the body's immune system to fully respond to the vaccine and to provide maximum protection. Later vaccination does still provide benefits because as long as the flu virus is circulating, individuals are at risk. 

6. Everyone is at risk of getting the flu.

Everyone is at risk for getting exposed to the influenza virus and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015), recommends that everyone over the age of 6 months old be vaccinated annually. Protection for healthcare workers is extremely important as they are likely to come in contact with individuals who are immunocompromised and are more susceptible to the virus.  It prevents them from getting the flu and prevents their patients from getting the flu, so everyone wins!

7. You can spread the flu virus before you realize you're sick.

At first, the flu may be mistaken for a common cold as symptoms may be similar. Typically colds will develop slowly whereas the flu will present much more suddenly. Common signs and symptoms of the flu may be a fever (over 100.4), aching muscles, chills, sweats, headaches, fatigue and weakness, dry and persistent cough, nasal congestion, and sore throat.  Symptoms as such may begin 1-4 days after the virus enters the body. Spreading of the virus occurs whether you are symptomatic or asymptomatic; therefore, individuals have the ability to spread the flu to others prior to noticing any flu-like symptoms themselves (CDC, 2014; Mayo Clinic, 2016).

8. The flu virus causes the flu - not the weather.

The winter/cold weather season does coincide with flu season. This may lead to individuals believing that the cold weather causes the flu. The only way for an individual to get the flu is to be exposed to the influenza virus - you will not catch the flu simply due to colder weather (Harvard Medical School, 2017).

9. Fast, easy, convenient - get the flu shot!

University Health Service will provide flu vaccinations for employees and volunteers working in the hospital and clinics free of charge throughout the flu season. Vaccinations start 10/3/17. Refer to the employee health (UHS) website for more information: http://intranet.uimcc.uic.edu/UHS/SitePages/Home.aspx

10. The Influenza virus causes a respiratory illness.

Many people use the term "stomach flu" when they are experiencing vomiting, diarrhea and nausea. While being "sick to your stomach" can sometimes be related to having severe respiratory illness like Influenza, these problems are not the main symptoms of Influenza. Stomach and intestinal problems can be caused by several viruses, bacteria or parasites. The flu is a respiratory disease and not a stomach or intestinal disease. (CDC, 2017b)

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014). How flu spreads.
Retrieved on August 13, 2017 from
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2017). Frequently Asked Flu Questions 2016-2017 Influenza Season.
Retrieved on August 10, 2017 from 
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season-2016-2017.htm

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2017a). Key Facts About Seasonal Flu Vaccine.
Retrieved on August 10, 2017 from
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2017b). Misconceptions about Seasonal Flu and Flu Vaccines 2017 Influenza Season.
Retrieved on August 22, 2017 from 
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/misconceptions.htm

Harvard Medical School (2017). 10 Flu Myths: Dispelling misinformation about the flu vaccine, sickness, treatment, and recovery.
Retrieved on August 15, 2017 from
https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/10-flu-myths

Mayo Clinic (2016) Influenza (flu).
Retrieved on August 14, 2017 from
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/flu/home/ovc-20248057


What is the flu?

The flu is the common term for seasonal influenza, which is caused by influenza viruses.  The virus infects the respiratory tract and causes symptoms such as fever or feeling feverish/chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches, fatigue (tiredness) and some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.  Unlike the common cold, the flu can cause severe illness and life-threatening complications in many people. In the United States more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from seasonal flu-related complications. Some people, such as older people, young children, pregnant women, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.  The best way to prevent the flu is to practice hand washing and get vaccinated.

When should I get vaccinated?

The CDC defines flu season as October through May, so it is important to get vaccinated as soon as the flu vaccine is available.  It takes about two weeks for the body to create it's immunity to the flu after being vaccinated. 

What is the difference between the quadrivalent and trivalent vaccine?

Every year the flu vaccine is formulated to protect against the strains of flu that are predicted to be the most common in the upcoming season.  This year, there are many different formulations available.  This season both trivalent (three component) and quadrivalent (four component) influenza vaccines will be available. Either vaccine is acceptable this year per the CDC and it is recommended to get immunized with any influenza that is available to you.

How long will the vaccine protect me for?

The vaccine doesn't protect you from the flu forever, in fact, the amount of time that it protects you for varies from year to year.  Which is why it is important to get vaccinated each year.  

Should children be vaccinated?

Absolutely!  The flu vaccine is recommended by the CDC for children 6 months and older.  Some children aged 6 months to 8 years of age may require two doses of the vaccine, so talk to your pediatrician about the proper vaccination schedule for your child.  It is important to have everyone in the family vaccinated for optimal protection to protect the young.

Can a flu shot give me the flu?

No, a flu shot cannot cause flu illness. The influenza viruses contained in a flu shot are inactivated (killed), which means they cannot cause infection. Flu vaccine manufacturers kill the viruses used in the vaccine during the process of making vaccine, and batches of flu vaccine are tested to make sure they are safe. In randomized, blinded studies, where some people get flu shots and others get salt-water shots, the only differences in symptoms was increased soreness in the arm and redness at the injection site among people who got the flu shot. There were no differences in terms of body aches, fever, cough, runny nose or sore throat.  Which means that when some people say that they got sick right after getting the vaccine, what might have happened was that they were starting to get sick to begin with. 

What are the possible side effects?

The most common reaction to the flu shot in adults has been soreness, redness or swelling at the spot where the shot was given. This usually lasts less than two days. Other reactions following the flu shot are usually mild and can include a low grade fever and aches. If these reactions occur, they usually begin soon after the shot and last 1-2 days. Remember that the most common reactions people have to flu vaccine are considerably less severe than the symptoms caused by actual flu illness.

What is the cost?

We accept most insurance plans for flu shot coverage. Please call the pharmacy for details.